CAG 2021: 71st Annual Meeting & Conference

Embracing connectivity: Coming together and moving forward 

VIRTUAL  Hosted by UNBC Geography  June 7-11, 2021

Please note: the submission of special session proposals and of individual paper/poster abstracts is now closed. / 

Veuillez noter : la soumission des propositions de séances spéciales et des résumés de communications ou d'affiches individuelles est maintenant terminée.

CALLS FOR PAPERS / APPELS À CONTRIBUTIONS

New Research in Feminist Economic Geographies

Organizers: E. Alkim Karaagac (University of Waterloo) & Nancy Worth (University of Waterloo)

[Find out more]

Critical Geographies of Canadian Wildfires 

Organizers: Adeniyi Asiyanbi (University of Calgary), Conny Davidsen (University of Calgary), Colin Sutherland (University of Guelph) 

[Find out more]

Geography of Health and Health Care

Organizer: Elijah Bisung (Queen's University)

[Find out more]

Geographies of Asia panel(s)

Organizer: Tom Waldichuk (Thompson Rivers University)

[Find out more]

Indigenous Peoples

Organizers: Gail Fondahl and Catherine Nolin (University of Northern British Columbia)

[Find out more]

Environment and Resources Study Group

Organizers: Jonathan Luedee (UofT) & Liam Kennedy-Slaney (SFU)

[Find out more]

Geospatial Data Science

Organizers: Henry Hart (University of Victoria), Majid Hojati (Wilfrid Laurier University), Jack McIlraith (Western University), Hongyu Zhang (McGill University)

[Find out more]

Healthy Aging in Community

Organizers: Sarah Nelson (University of Nebraska at Omaha), Joseph A. Braimah (Queen’s University), Mark W. Rosenberg (Queen’s University)

[Find out more]

Economic Geography - Complexity and Connectivity after the COVID-19 Crisis  

Organizers: Derrek Eberts (Brandon University) & Patrick Brouder (Vancouver Island University)

[Find out more]

Labour geographies and remaking the economic landscape: Agency and activism 

Organizers: Angeline Ram (University of Waterloo), Margaret Walton-Roberts (Wilfrid Laurier University), Luisa Veronis (University of Ottawa)

[Find out more]

Urban Geography Special Sessions

Organizer: Evan Cleave (Ryerson University)

[Find out more]

Migration. Dislocation. Method. Policy.

Organizer: Michael Buzzelli (University of Western Ontario)

[Find out more]

Managed Retreat in Canada: A Climate Change Adaptation Strategy

Organizer: Melissa Le Geyt (University of Waterloo)

[Find out more]

Urban protected areas: establishment, management, and research

Organizer: Christopher D. Malcolm (Brandon University) 

[Find out more]

Re-connecting Voices and Re-mapping Territories in Geographic Education - Sessions 1, 2, 3

Organizers: Kelley McClinchey (Wilfrid Laurier University) & Chantal Déry (Université du Québec en Outaouais)

[Find out more]

Zooming into New Feminist Futures?

Organizers: Ismahan Yusuf (Western University), Brittany Davey (Western University), Rosalind Ragetlie

[Find out more]

 

New Research in Feminist Economic Geographies

Organizers: E. Alkim Karaagac (University of Waterloo) & Nancy Worth (University of Waterloo)

 

Feminist theoretical and empirical interventions in economic geography have expanded the range of economic subjects, spaces and activities beyond the traditional notions of waged labour, formal workspace and production for a capitalist market (Nagar et al., 2002). By positing economics as relational, contextualized, embodied and realized through practices, feminist scholars have set the stage for an alternative language, theory and praxis of ‘non-capitalism’ (Massey, 1997; McDowell, 2007; Gibson-Graham 1996, 2008). They have made important contributions to ‘re-thinking the economy’ in economic geography, by engaging with questions of social and environmental justice in struggles over public goods, practices of commoning, and recently revitalized debates on post-growth economies.

 

This call for papers aims to contribute to long lasting feminist interventions and innovations in economic geography by exploring new research in feminist economic geographies, informed by lived realities. We acknowledge that for many of us today, the lived reality is a looming care crisis in the midst of a global pandemic that deepens entrenched gendered, racialized and ableist inequalities. Yet we find hope in our collective thinking, research and organizing as a form of solidarity. 

For this special session, we are seeking conceptual, theoretical, empirical, political, and methodological contributions that engage with, but are not limited to, the following areas:

 

Understanding labour and work under neoliberalism

  • Feminized labour and labour precarity (e.g., essential work/frontline worker)

  • Gendered work and changing relationships to work (e.g., work from home)

  • Reproductive and domestic labour, and their connections to the ‘economic’ (e.g., the value of caregiving)

  • Examinations of unpaid work—including interning, volunteering, care (e.g., homeschooling, child and elderly care during pandemic)

Encountering economic restructuring in the post-crisis and post pandemic era

  • Coping with crises and negotiating austerity (she-cession)

  • Everyday financial practices, lived experiences of credit and debt

  • Financialization of social reproduction and crises of care

  • Politics and actions around alternatives/ ways of surviving

Navigating conceptual and theoretical frontiers 

  • Re-imagining units of analysis, scales of measurement and subjectivities in economic geography

  • Developing intersectional research on environmental/climate justice, value creation, wealth and income, financialization and dispossession, economic recovery and solidarity

  • Engaging with concepts of diverse economies, cruel optimism, precariousness, radical vulnerability, commoning, digitality, futurity, and ‘essential’ work

Please send paper abstracts (max 250 words), including the title of the proposed contribution, name of author(s), and contact information to Alkim Karaagac (eakaraag@uwaterloo.ca) by March 22nd, 2021.

Critical Geographies of Canadian Wildfires 

Organizers: Adeniyi Asiyanbi (University of Calgary), Conny Davidsen (University of Calgary), Colin Sutherland (University of Guelph) 

 

Concerns are growing about current and future wildfire risks to Canadian society in the face of environmental and socio-political change, prompting important questions for critical geographers. These questions draw attention to the diverse objectives, interests and relations that converge around wildfires as spatio-temporal processes that are, at once, ecological, social, cultural and political. The eminently socio-political nature of fires is evident in how they get understood, experienced and mediated in ways that reflect differences of human-environment conceptualizations, political views, class, race and gender. As such, critical, including intersectional analyses can reveal how discursive meanings, uses and the range of responses to landscape fires are bound up with often unequal relations over time and across space. These historically and geographically contingent relations that make fires possible (and impossible) are constituted and mediated by humans and more-than-humans, institutions, culture and economy. 

While historical fire management policies and practices continue to have implications for current practices, climate change-related projections of Canadian wildfires warn of increasing wildfire severity into the future. Moreover, the long and uneven history of fire suppression on the Canadian landscape and contemporary attempts to “return” fires highlight the tensions between the settler approaches to fire management and Indigenous fire practices that rely on fire’s active role on the land. As scholars of fires show, such tensions are related to issues of power, cosmology, colonialism, territory, resource extraction, state-making and place-making. Critical geography is well placed to deepen analyses of these issues. Such analyses are critical at a time when diverse and often competing visions for managing fires and governing fire-society relations lend renewed significance to debates about risk, resilience, security and environmental sustainability. Building on existing work, geographers are positioned to offer unique perspectives on how, where and with what effects these competing visions of (desirable) fire futures are being negotiated, enacted and contested. 

  

This panel invites critical geographical work including empirical, theoretical and review papers on wildfires and broader landscape fires in the Canadian context. Indicative themes include: 

  • Conceptualizations of wildfire, risk and resilience 

  • Wildfire governance and neoliberalism 

  • Discourses and practices of wildfire preparedness  

  • Critical perspectives on wildland-urban interfaces 

  • Political ecology of wildfires and landscapes that burn 

  • Indigenous fire knowledge and practices 

  • Fires, colonialism and decolonization 

  • Critical perspectives on prescribed burning  

  • Critical perspectives on firefighting  

  • Critical perspectives on forest industry fire practices  

  • Political economies of wildfire prevention and/or suppression 

  • Forest fires and climate change mitigation 

  • Uncertainty and fire futures 

  • Environmental histories of fire management 

 

Please send a 250-word abstract to Adeniyi Asiyanbi (adeniyi.asiyanbi@ucalgary.ca), Conny Davidsen (davidsen@ucalgary.ca) and Colin Sutherland (colinrobertsutherland@gmail.com) latest by March 10, 2021.  

Geography of Health and Health Care

Organizer: Elijah Bisung (Queen's University)

 

The Geography of Health and Health Care Study (GHHCSG) group will organize paper sessions at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Geographers (CAG), which will run virtually from June 7-11, 2021. Themed sessions will be organized around the following topics:

  • Geographies of Aging

  • Caregiving

  • Chronic diseases

  • Climate change and health

  • Disability

  • (Re)Emerging health risks

  • Environmental determinants of health

  • Global health

  • Health policy and practice

  • Healthcare systems and services

  • Health of marginalized populations

  • Infectious disease

  • Mental health

  • Psychosocial health

  • Quality of life and well-being

  • Technology and health

  • Theories and methods in medical/health geography

  • Spatial epidemiology

  • Other areas of geographies of health and health care

 

Please send your paper title and abstracts (250 words max, and up to five key word terms) to Elijah Bisung at ghhcsg@gmail.com by March, 05 2021.

Geographies of Asia panel(s)

Organizer: Tom Waldichuk (Thompson Rivers University)

 

The Geographies of Asia Study Group is organizing one or more panels on Asian topics and is particularly keen on soliciting papers and posters related to the conference theme “Embracing connectivity: Coming together and moving forward.”  Asia is the most populous continent and region of the world, with extreme variations in economic and social development amid a changing regional and global cultural context.  We request all submissions that deal with Asian countries.  In particular, we encourage graduate and undergraduate students to present and participate in the Geographies of Asia Student Presentation Competition.  The best paper or poster presentation will receive $150 at the graduate level and $100 in the undergraduate category.

 

Please submit your proposed title, presentation format (poster or paper), abstract (maximum 250 words), and presenter information to Tom Waldichuk (twaldichuk@tru.ca) prior to submitting your abstracts to the conference.  You must register for the conference before you can submit an abstract.  The deadline to submit an abstract is March 26 at https://www.cag-acg.ca/cag2021-registration.  

Thank you in advance for your consideration.  We look forward to seeing you online.

Indigenous Peoples

Organizers: Gail Fondahl and Catherine Nolin (University of Northern British Columbia)

The Indigenous Peoples Working Group (IPWG) will organize paper sessions at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Geographers (CAG), which will run virtually from June 7-11, 2021. Themed sessions will be organized around broad topics such as:

  • Indigenous governance of natural resource extraction

  • Indigenous peoples and living well

  • Land Back initiatives

  • Indigenous peoples and protected areas

  • Extractivism and Indigenous rights and futures

  • Best practices of carrying out research with Indigenous communities 

 

Please send your paper title and abstracts (250 words max, and up to five key word terms) to Catherine Nolin at catherine.nolin@unbc.ca & Gail Fondahl at gail.fondahl@unbc.ca by March 12th (latest) prior to submitting your abstracts to the conference. You must register for the conference before you can submit an abstract. The deadline to submit an abstract is March 26 at https://www.cag-acg.ca/cag2021-registration.  

Environment and Resources Study Group

Organizers: Jonathan Luedee (UofT) & Liam Kennedy-Slaney (SFU)

The Environment and Resources Study Group (ERSG) will organize paper sessions for the CAG's virtual conference, which will be hosted by UNBC from June 7 - June 11, 2021. Sessions will be organized around the following topics: 

  • Critical geographies of environmental governance and resource management

  • The environmental politics of sustainability  

  • Resource extraction, colonialism, and resistance

  • Toxic geographies: discards, contaminants, waste, and pollution

  • The geographies of energy transition

  • Infrastructures of extractivism 

  • Culture, communities, and resources 

  • The human dimensions of environmental change

  • Resource Temporalities

 

This list is not exhaustive, and the ERSG welcomes papers that address the broad and interdisciplinary interests of environmental and resource geographers. 

 

If you are interested in participating in an ERSG-sponsored session, please submit a 250-word (max) abstract to Jonathan Luedee (jonathan.luedee@utoronto.ca) by March 12, 2021 prior to submitting your abstract to the conference. 

 

Membership in the ERSG is free for students and postdocs. If you would like to become a member of the ERSG, please email to Kathryn Laferriere (kathryn.laferriere@cag-acg.ca) with a request to be added to the study group. Other CAG members can email Katie to request an invoice to pay dues for SG membership. 

Geospatial Data Science

Organizers: Henry Hart (University of Victoria), Majid Hojati (Wilfrid Laurier University), Jack McIlraith (Western University), Hongyu Zhang (McGill University)

In the increasingly digital world we live in, the geographical phenomenon we observe and study are increasingly represented by geospatial data. New types of data from social media, mobile applications, and sensor technologies have created opportunities for geographic analysis that is traditionally based on census outcomes. The “data deluge” (Kitchin, 2014) and the changing context of spatial data generation have pushed GI software from standalone systems to connected services for expanded analytical capacity (Gorman, 2013). Theoretical discoveries, as a result, can be data-driven in the fourth paradigm of science (Hey, Tansley & Tolle, 2009). Geospatial researchers are increasingly well-equipped to create and use geospatial data to gain insight into geographical processes such as traffic patterns, crop health, crime distribution, climate systems, and virtually any other spatial process. The diversity, richness, and ubiquity of geospatial data provides a wealth of opportunities for research with a broad range of applications, and has become an area of research in and of itself.

 

In this series of special sessions on Geospatial Data Science, we invite submissions of applied, theoretical, or methods-based research using innovative techniques situated at the intersection of Geographic Information Systems and Data Science. We especially welcome researchers from undergraduate and graduate students who are using modern computational tools to study geographical problems and data.

Topics

Potential areas of research may include (but are not limited to):

  • Agent-based modelling

  • GeoAI

  • CyberGIS

  • Free and Open Source GIS

  • Spatial data models for ‘big’ data

  • Big data analytics

  • Temporal GIS

  • Trajectory analysis

  • Spatial statistics

  • Citizen Science

  • Ethics of GIS

Sessions

We invite research presentations in three types of special sessions on geospatial data science as follows:

1. Lightning Talks (3-5 minute presentations [question period at the end])

We are inviting research presentations for this lightning talks session on a variety of geospatial data science topics. Each lightning talk will be a maximum of five minutes long. Lightning talks are an excellent way to share progress and preliminary results of research involving geospatial data and methods. We strongly encourage work-in-progress submissions from researchers at all levels.  This is an excellent opportunity to get feedback on emerging research ideas.

2. Paper Presentations (fifteen-minute presentations [10+5])

We are soliciting research paper presentations on topics that involve geographic information science and data science applied or theoretical problems or methodologies. We encourage submissions involving research at the intersection of data science and geographical information science. We aim to showcase how geospatial data and computational methods are being used across the range of applications encountered in geographical research.

 

3. Panel Discussion (5 minute intro from each panelist + questions)

Alongside this special session, we will host a discussion roundtable where we intend to identify common themes, trends, and skillsets encountered by geographers and domain specialists working with geospatial data in different applications within geography. We invite CAG participants to discuss what it means to do geospatial data science based on their own experiences. We are actively seeking a diverse cast of panel members who range in age, career experience, ethnic background and field of study, and as such, we encourage early-career researchers/upper year graduate students, post docs, or assistant professors to participate. The goal is to have an inter-disciplinary and inter-personal discussion surrounding the benefits and challenges of geospatial data science in their own research.

 

Those interested in giving a lightning talk or paper presentation on their research should submit a max 250 word abstract Majid Hojati (hoja4090@mylaurier.ca) by March 26th 2021 and register for CAG.

 

Organizing Committee

Henry Hart, University of Victoria, hhart4@uvic.ca

Majid Hojati, Wilfrid Laurier University, hoja4090@mylaurier.ca

Jack McIlraith, Western University, jmcilrai@uwo.ca

Hongyu Zhang, McGill University, hongyu.zhang@mail.mcgill.ca

 

References

  • Gorman, S. P. (2013). The danger of a big data episteme and the need to evolve geographic information systems. Dialogues in Human Geography, 3(3), 285-291.

  • Hey, T., S. Tansley, and K. M. Tolle. (2009). The Fourth Paradigm: Data-Intensive Scientific Discovery. Redmond: Microsoft Research.

  • Kitchin, R. (2014). Big Data, new epistemologies and paradigm shifts. Big data & society, 1(1), 2053951714528481.

Healthy Aging in Community

Organizers: Sarah Nelson (University of Nebraska at Omaha), Joseph A. Braimah (Queen’s University), Mark W. Rosenberg (Queen’s University)

As populations around the world grow older, scholarship turns to questions about healthy or successful aging (Chireh & D’Arcy, 2018; Hodge, 2008). In Canada, there has been a push over the past decade to promote aging in place, supported by age-friendly community policies and improving home care services (Johnson et al., 2018; Steels, 2015). The COVID-19 pandemic has shone a spotlight on older people’s living conditions in some long-term care homes, highlighting issues related to quality of life in some institutional settings, and bringing questions about how to support older people in their homes and in the community to the fore. 

 

Critics argue that aging in place puts a heavy burden on families and community organizations, and overlooks those not able to safely remain in their homes, such as those living with chronic illnesses, dementia or chronic pain, or those who are very frail (Koller et al., 2010; Olson, 1994). Others note that plans for age-friendly communities and aging in place continue to underrepresent older Indigenous peoples, LGBTQ2S+ individuals, members of immigrant communities, or racialized peoples, or overlook gendered differences in experiences of aging (Kim, Jen, & Fredriksen-goldsen, 2017; Wilson, Rosenberg, & Abonyi, 2011). In this session, we welcome papers that contribute to all sides of the conversation about healthy aging in community – in Canada and beyond – including but not limited to: 

  • Critical perspectives on aging in community 

  • Roles of older people within communities 

  • The ongoing importance of the health care system and long-term care 

  • Improvements within residential care facilities 

  • Strategies for improving community capacity for elder care 

  • Cultural or community-specific strategies for care of older community members 

  • The role of family or intergenerational ties, including diverse ways of conceptualizing “family” 

  • The impacts on and response to COVID-19 as they relate to older populations 

 

This session is sponsored by the Geography of Health and Health Care Study Group

 

Please send abstracts to snelson57@unomaha.edu or 17jab3@queensu.ca no later than March 24, 2020

References: 

Chireh, B., & D’Arcy, C. (2018). Pain and self-rated health among middle-aged and older Canadians: An analysis of the Canadian community health survey - Healthy aging. BMC Public Health, 18(1), 1–11. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5912-9 

 

Hodge, G. (2008). The Geography of Aging: Preparing Communities for the Surge in Seniors. Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queens University Press. 

 

Johnson, S., Bacsu, J., Abeykoon, H., McIntosh, T., Jeffery, B., & Novik, N. (2018). No Place Like Home: A Systematic Review of Home Care for Older Adults in Canada. Canadian Journal on Aging, 37(4), 400–419. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0714980818000375 

 

Kim, H., Jen, S., & Fredriksen-goldsen, K. I. (2017). Race / Ethnicity and Health-Related Quality of Life Among LGBT Older Adults, 57, 30–39. https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnw172 

 

Koller, D., Eisele, M., Kaduszkiewicz, H., Schon, G., Steinmann, S., Wiese, B., … van den Bussche, H. (2010). Ambulatory health services utilization in patients with dementia - Is there an urban-rural difference? International Journal of Health Geographics, 9, 59. 

 

Olson, L. K. (1994). The graying of the world: who will care for the frail elderly? New York: Haworth Press. 

 

Steels, S. (2015). Key characteristics of age-friendly cities and communities : A review. Cities, 47, 45–52. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2015.02.004 

 

Wilson, K., Rosenberg, M. W., & Abonyi, S. (2011). Aboriginal peoples, health and healing approaches: The effects of age and place on health. Social Science & Medicine, 72, 355– 364. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2010.09.022

Economic Geography - Complexity and Connectivity after the COVID-19 Crisis  

Special Session sponsored by the CAG Economic Geography Group

Organizers: Derrek Eberts (Brandon University) ebertsd@brandonu.ca and Patrick Brouder (Vancouver Island University) patrick.brouder@viu.ca

This special session on Economic Geography invites theoretical and empirical research papers under the heading ‘Complexity and Connectivity after the COVID-19 Crisis’. Papers may highlight topics including innovation space, networks, policy, economic development, knowledge creation, economic relatedness and specialization, institutions, trade, labour, resilience, and regional growth, amongst others.

 

The title is partly in response to the theme of CAG 2021 since economic geographers are well placed to say something about connectivity across spaces and within places; it is also a response to the present global crisis which is reshaping the distribution of economic activity across space on a global scale and raising important questions of equity in place at a more localised level.

 

The organizers welcome papers at all stages of development from ideation to publication and from all scholars from undergraduates to senior professors. Please send abstracts (incl. title, author(s), and up to 200 word description) to the session organizers. This session is organized by Canadian Association of Geographers - Economic Geography Group (CAG-EGG): https://sites.google.com/view/cagegg

 

Labour geographies and remaking the economic landscape: Agency and activism 

Organizers: Angeline Ram (University of Waterloo), Margaret Walton-Roberts (Wilfrid Laurier University), Luisa Veronis (University of Ottawa)

Labour geography's interdisciplinary research straddles "economic, political, social and cultural concerns (Gregory et al., 2017:404)," offering many theoretical and empirical insights through the lens of the workforce (Castree, 2007; Herod, 1997). Through labour’s sentience, labour acts as socio-spatial actors, capable of manipulating working conditions (Castree, 2007; Herod, 1997, 2003; Herod et al., 2007; Jordhus-lier, 2007; Tuft and Savage, 2007) and altering economic landscapes through their agency.  Despite neoliberalism’s emphasis on capitalism’s accumulation of wealth through the pseudo commodification or the workforce (Storper and Walker,1983:4), labour’s position in the current context of a global pandemic suggests an opportune moment to examine the motivations and rationale behind the agency and activism of labour . Labour is often grouped as an undifferentiated mass (Herod, 2018), making less visible different workforce characteristics, races, genders and ethnicities (McDowell, 2015), experiences within spaces, and spatial divisions based on their unique position. Debates regarding labour ‘s agency and activism are multifarious, exposing opportunities for geographical and sectoral intersections across diverse interest to enhance workplace experiences. 

 

This call for papers aims to contribute to emerging labour issues by exploring research that exposes the multiple factors that affect the challenges and opportunities that face labour at the current moment. We encourage submissions based on research-in-progress and completed research projects by those at various stages of their academic career for this special session.  We seek contributions that engage with labour’s experience in transforming and improving working conditions and how labour shapes their working and living environments. 
 

Please forward a title, abstract (max 200 words), and author information directly to Angeline Ram (a7ram@uwaterloo.ca) by March 26, 2021 and register for CAG.

Urban Geography Special Sessions

Organizer: Evan Cleave (Ryerson University)

The Urban Geography Study Group is organizing paper sessions for the 2021 CAG Annual Meeting, which will run virtually from June 7-11, 2021. 

 

We are seeking papers covering a wide range of urban-related topics –historical and contemporary, local and global, as well as situated in Canadian and non-Canadian contexts. The aim of these sessions is to present a range of theoretical and conceptual perspectives and methodological approaches. Broad, inter-related themes include (but are not limited to):

 

Issues facing Cities

  • Urban crisis, response, and resilience (i.e. impacts and response to Covid-19, natural disasters, climate change)

  • Housing and real estate 

  • Transportation and infrastructure 

  • The urban environment and sustainability

 

Peoples of Cities

  • Social issues and cities (i.e. policing, racism, poverty, marginalization)

  • Population growth, decline, and aging

  • Issues related to public health and wellbeing

  • Social welfare in an urban context

  • Immigration and cities

 

Urban Governance and Planning

  • Governance and its impact on planning, policy and development

  • Evidenced-based planning and quantifying/measuring outcomes

  • Sustainable cities - planning and practice

 

Urban Economy

  • Issues related to local economic development planning, policy, and practice

  • Integrating economic development and urban development/planning

  • Contemporary economic challenges and opportunities facing cities

  • Cities in a global capitalist system

 

Other topics related to cities, urban planning and development, and the urban environment

 

Please send your paper title and abstract (maximum 250 words; and up to five key words) to Evan Cleave at evan.cleave@ryerson.ca by March 22, 2021.

 

 

Migration. Dislocation. Method. Policy.

Organizer: Michael Buzzelli (University of Western Ontario)

Migration is an abiding interest of the geographical enterprise. At all scales, migration reveals the human spirit, it reframes the population settlement puzzle and it offers a palette of methodologies from the individual to the socio-spatial network. This CAG 2020 session focuses on the topology of migration’s origins and destinations: the motivations, experiences, patterns and dislocations of settlement and adjustment. Theoretical, applied and methodological contributions are welcome.

Sample topics:

  • Population/demography, domestic and international

  • Scales, from the individual through community to global scale, such as the place of migrants in chains/social networks of transnational communities

  • Connectedness and interaction in the Web 2.0+ world and the implications for the (ir)relevance of place

  • Regional, national and international human capital markets that impel and draw movers

  • Policy inquiry such as the economic development practices of talent attraction and retention

  • Methodological and technical innovation, including visualisation, spatio-temporal approaches and other implements-of-pride in the geographer’s toolkit

 

Submissions and queries welcome.

 

Ebenezer Narh and Michael Buzzelli (mbuzzel@uwo.ca)

Geography and Environment, The University of Western Ontario

Managed Retreat in Canada: A Climate Change Adaptation Strategy

Organizer: Melissa Le Geyt (University of Waterloo)

As climate change increases risk related to natural hazards such as floods, many Canadian communities are finding themselves facing difficult decisions about the location of housing, industry and infrastructure. One emerging response to climate-related hazards is to move people, property and critical infrastructure out of flood-prone areas, a process commonly known as managed retreat. Panelists will present research related to managed retreat, including recent instances where managed retreat was considered or applied in Canada.

Contact Melissa Le Geyt if interested in joining this session (mjlegeyt@uwaterloo.ca).

Urban protected areas: establishment, management, and research

Organizer: Christopher D. Malcolm (Brandon University) 

Infusing nature, and particularly protected areas in urban landscapes has received less attention from protected areas academics and managers than have remote protected areas. Yet, as the global proportion of urban dwellers rises, estimated to be 6.7 billion by 2050, equalling twice as many as rural (Ritchie & Roser, 2018); as this process occurs, humans are becoming less connected with nature, suffering from “nature-deficit disorder” (Louv, 2008). Urban protected areas are defined by Trynza et al. (2014) as “protected areas in or at the edge of larger population centres,” and serve to provide nature connection to urban dwellers, particularly those that might not be able to visit remote protected areas. Urban protected areas are distinctive from remote protected areas in a number of ways, both scientific and social, as described by Trynza et al. (2014). This CAG Special Session aims to explore the establishment, management, characteristics, and research, both scientific and socio-economic, in Canada and around the world.

 

If you would like to participate in this session, please send paper titles and abstracts of maximum 250 words to Christopher D. Malcolm at: malcolmc@brandonu.ca by March 25.  

 

References:

Louv, R. (2008). Last child in the woods: Saving our children from nature-deficit disorder. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin Books.

 

Ritchie, H., Roser, M. (2018) - "Urbanization". Published online at OurWorldInData.org. Retrieved from: 'https://ourworldindata.org/urbanization' [Online Resource].

 

Trzyna, T. (2014). Urban Protected Areas: Profiles and best practice guidelines. Best Practice Protected Area Guidelines Series No. 22, Gland, Switzerland: IUCN. xiv + 110pp.

Re-connecting Voices and Re-mapping Territories in Geographic Education - Sessions 1, 2, 3

Organizers: Kelley McClinchey (Wilfrid Laurier University) & Chantal Déry (Université du Québec en Outaouais)

SESSION 1: Tools & Take-aways (K-12 + cégep au Québec educators, pre-service/teacher training)

 

Never before has it been more important to be geographically literate (Schell & Mohan, 2013). This session is designed to be a collective sharing PD. Each educator (presenter) will have 10-15 minutes to share/talk about an innovate lesson plan, application (technology or otherwise), learning cycle, project, that aligns with the special session theme, Re-connecting Voices and Re-mapping Territories in Geographic Education. After each participant shares, there will be a short collaborative Q&A that begins to build networks and collaborations within the K-12 sector. At the close of the session, each participant receives access to the tools & take-aways of the session.

 

Please submit an expression of interest via a 150-250-word paragraph/abstract describing your contribution to the session. Please also indicate which session(s) you would be interested in participating in. Address correspondence to kmcclinchey@wlu.ca by March 24, 2021.

 

Schell, E. & Mohan, A. (2013). Road Map for 21st Century Geographic Education: Instructional Materials and Professional Development, The Geography Teacher, 10(1), 6-14, DOI: 10.1080/19338341.2012.758597

SESSION 2: Connecting & Collaborating (post-secondary, pre-service/teacher training, and K-12 + cégep au Québec educators)

 

We examine the ways in which academic organizations, and the informal and formal networks it cultivates, attempts to foster an anti-oppressive mentoring community of geographers. We also analyze how these networks are shaped by and embedded in neoliberal institutions in the discipline of geography and higher education as a whole. Building networks and connections among K-12, cégep au Québec educators, and post-secondary educators has been a long desire of CAG. It is important to plant the seeds of geographic education by nourishing the development of future geography post-secondary students. We cannot keep our geography departments/courses alive without building the health of geography from the bottom-up. As a post-secondary educator, let’s connect with K-12 educators in your region to encourage growth and diversity in geography. There will be a short panel discussion and then contact made with participants to work at building bridges between the sectors.

 

Please submit an expression of interest via a 150-250-word paragraph/abstract describing your contribution to the session. Please also indicate which session(s) you would be interested in participating in. Address correspondence to kmcclinchey@wlu.ca by March 24, 2021.

SESSION 3: Navigating New Narratives in the Uncharted Territories of the 2020s post-secondary classroom (post-secondary educators, K-12 + cégep au Québec educators)

 

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, Section 10 states that we need to educate students on residential schools, Treaties and Aboriginal peoples’ historical and contemporary contributions to Canada and build capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy and mutual respect. Following this call and aligning with Culturally Responsive and Relevant Pedagogy, we want to address how to navigate spatial and geo-literacy applying complex new narratives to the learning and teaching of geography (Greenwood, 2009). This session seeks contributions that incorporate diverse narratives such as those associated with Indigenous studies and multicultural education.

 

Please submit an expression of interest via a 150-250-word paragraph/abstract describing your contribution to the session. Please also indicate which session(s) you would be interested in participating in. Address correspondence to kmcclinchey@wlu.ca by March 24, 2021.

 

Greenwood, D. (2009). Place: The nexus of geography and culture in McKenzie, M., Hart, P., Bai, H., Jickling, B. (Eds) Fields of Green: Restorying Culture, Environment and Education. pp.271-282. Hampton Press, Inc.: New Jersey.

Zooming into New Feminist Futures?

Organizers: Ismahan Yusuf (Western University), Brittany Davey (Western University), Rosalind Ragetlie

As feminists, we have always adapted to the constraints of our socio-political contexts — forever refining our meeting strategies, modes of theorizing and activist tactics in care-full consideration of the dynamic world (Trier-Bieniek, 2020; Zimmerman, 2017). It is for this reason that feminists have latched onto the alternative, accessible and artistic tools of infographics and infrastructure (e.g., posting radical feminist information on public bus shelters, and the bases of street lights) as well as Zines and microblogs (e.g., Tumblr, Crunk Feminist Collective) to share transversive knowledge without compromising the safety of the marginalized (Baumgardner, 2011). In a current world characterized by a ‘6 feet/2 meters’ mandate of social distance, feminists are confronted once again with a pressing need to re-conceptualize how we connect, collaborate, and ultimately care for every-body during a pandemic necessitating that we stay apart to stay alive. We invite panelists to share and discuss — rather informally — what virtual tools, tactics, patterns and practices, as well as self care strategies they have drawn upon over the past year to show up for their communities and themselves. Whether virtually and materially, how are we taking up the feminist agendas of reflexivity, reflectivity and reciprocity from home (and/or elsewhere) during this time of heightened precarity? Inspired by Smyth and Linz’s (2018) AAG session entitled “A Feminist Coven in the University,” we hope that this session will spark critical conversations about the ways in which we might begin to cultivate a digital feminist coven of closeness amidst a medical climate demanding that we remain socially distanced.

Contact Ismahan Yusuf (iyusuf3@uwo.ca) if you are interested in joining this panel. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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